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Long-term natural succession improves nitrogen storage capacity of soil on the Loess Plateau, China
Deng, L (Deng, Lei)[ 1 ]; Wang, KB (Wang, Kai-bo)[ 2 ]; Shangguan, ZP (Shangguan, Zhou-ping)[ 1 ]
2014
Source PublicationSoil Research
Volume52Issue:3Pages:262-270
Subtype期刊论文
Abstract

Land-use change resulting from natural succession enhances the nitrogen (N) accumulation capacity of terrestrial ecosystems. To explore those factors that foster changes in soil N storage under evolving conditions of vegetation succession, a study on N storage at differing stages along a 150-year chronosequence was conducted in the Ziwuling Forest Region in the central part of the Loess Plateau, China. A principal finding was the rapid increase in N storage in the 0-60cm soil layer, which achieves a stable value after the shrub community stage (∼50-60 years), leading to the overall long-term (∼150 years) accumulation of soil stored N in the post-abandonment secondary forest. Soil N accumulated mainly in the pioneer stage and showed a significant increase before the shrub community stage (P<0.05). The N storage in the 0-60cm soil layer changed from 5.8 to 8.4Mgha-1 during the transition from abandoned farmland (∼3-5 years) to climax community (Quercus liaotungensis Koidz forest) (∼150 years). The N storage values were higher in the upper (<20cm) than the deeper soil layers (>20cm). In the topsoil (0-20cm), N storage values showed a markedly positive correlation with soil organic carbon (SOC), total soil N and fine roots. In the deeper soil layers (20-40 and 40-60cm) there was a correlation only with TN. Soil bulk density, soil water content and soil pH were not the determining factors behind N storage values in the topsoil (0-20cm), although they did show negative, positive and negative correlations, respectively. In addition, they showed no consistent correlations in the lower soil layer (<20cm). The results suggest that changes to N storage values were the result of the accumulation of SOC, total N and primary productivity during the process of forest succession, and this capacity is positively related to post-abandonment forest succession on the Loess Plateau, China.

KeywordChina Natural Succession Nitrogen Storage Ziwuling Forest Region
DOI10.1071/SR12377
Indexed BySCI ; EI
Language英语
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.ieecas.cn/handle/361006/9700
Collection生态环境研究室
Corresponding AuthorShangguan, ZP (Shangguan, Zhou-ping)[ 1 ]
Affiliation1.State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming on the Loess Plateau,Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, P.R. China;
2.State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment,Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710075, P.R. China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Deng, L ,Wang, KB ,Shangguan, ZP . Long-term natural succession improves nitrogen storage capacity of soil on the Loess Plateau, China[J]. Soil Research,2014,52(3):262-270.
APA Deng, L ,Wang, KB ,&Shangguan, ZP .(2014).Long-term natural succession improves nitrogen storage capacity of soil on the Loess Plateau, China.Soil Research,52(3),262-270.
MLA Deng, L ,et al."Long-term natural succession improves nitrogen storage capacity of soil on the Loess Plateau, China".Soil Research 52.3(2014):262-270.
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