IEECAS OpenIR  > 加速器质谱中心
Sedimentary biogeochemical record in Lake Gonghai: Implications for recent lake changes in relatively remote areas of China
Wan, DJ (Wan, Dejun)[ 1,2 ]; Mao, X (Mao, Xin)[1 ]; Jin, ZD (Jin, Zhangdong)[ 2,3 ]; Song, L (Song, Lei)[ 1 ]; Yang, JS (Yang, Jinsong)[1 ]; Yang, HD (Yang, Handong)[ 4 ]
2019-02-01
Source PublicationSCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT
Volume649Pages:929-937
Contribution Rank2
AbstractOwing to rapid socio-economic development and climate warming, lakes even in remote areas have experienced marked changes in the last century. However, there are few studies revealing the multi-faceted biogeochemical changes and disentangling impacts of human and climate in relatively remote lakes in China. In this study we reconstructed historical changes of geochemistry, nutrition, primary production, ecology, and pollution in an alpine lake (Gonghai) in central North China, and revealed coherent changes and drivers in relatively remote Chinese lakes by compiling other records. Results show that Lake Gonghai has experienced considerably biogeochemical changes since the 1980s induced mainly by increased regional human activities, with detected human-related changes occurring in the 1950s-70s. The most important change is a shift of diatom primary producers in the 1980s, caused mainly by an increase of regional atmospheric N and P deposition associated with rapid socioeconomic development. Another remarkable change is the increase of pollution levels since the 1980s, represented by heavy metals, also caused by atmospheric deposition. Compiled sediment records demonstrate similar biogeochemical changes in most lakes from relatively remote areas of China since the 1970s-80s, associated closely with increased inputs of human-induced atmospheric N, P and pollutants, whereas the influence of climate warming is likely limited. This study highlights markedly human-related biogeochemical changes in relatively remote Chinese lakes during the Anthropocene epoch.
KeywordGlobal warming Human activity Pollution Diatom Regime shift Remote lake
Indexed BySCI ; SCIE
Language英语
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.ieecas.cn/handle/361006/10965
Collection加速器质谱中心
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Geol Sci, Inst Hydrogeol & Environm Geol, Shijiazhuang 050061, Hebei, Peoples R China;
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Earth Environm, State Key Lab Loess & Quaternary Geol, Xian 710075, Shaanxi, Peoples R China;
3.Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Global Environm Change, Xian 710049, Shaanxi, Peoples R China;
4.UCL, Environm Change Res Ctr, London WC1E 6BT, England
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Wan, DJ ,Mao, X ,Jin, ZD ,et al. Sedimentary biogeochemical record in Lake Gonghai: Implications for recent lake changes in relatively remote areas of China[J]. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT,2019,649:929-937.
APA Wan, DJ ,Mao, X ,Jin, ZD ,Song, L ,Yang, JS ,&Yang, HD .(2019).Sedimentary biogeochemical record in Lake Gonghai: Implications for recent lake changes in relatively remote areas of China.SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT,649,929-937.
MLA Wan, DJ ,et al."Sedimentary biogeochemical record in Lake Gonghai: Implications for recent lake changes in relatively remote areas of China".SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT 649(2019):929-937.
Files in This Item:
File Name/Size DocType Version Access License
Sedimentary biogeoch(2374KB)期刊论文作者接受稿开放获取CC BY-NC-SAApplication Full Text
Related Services
Recommend this item
Bookmark
Usage statistics
Export to Endnote
Google Scholar
Similar articles in Google Scholar
[Wan, DJ (Wan, Dejun)[ 1,2 ]]'s Articles
[Mao, X (Mao, Xin)[1 ]]'s Articles
[Jin, ZD (Jin, Zhangdong)[ 2,3 ]]'s Articles
Baidu academic
Similar articles in Baidu academic
[Wan, DJ (Wan, Dejun)[ 1,2 ]]'s Articles
[Mao, X (Mao, Xin)[1 ]]'s Articles
[Jin, ZD (Jin, Zhangdong)[ 2,3 ]]'s Articles
Bing Scholar
Similar articles in Bing Scholar
[Wan, DJ (Wan, Dejun)[ 1,2 ]]'s Articles
[Mao, X (Mao, Xin)[1 ]]'s Articles
[Jin, ZD (Jin, Zhangdong)[ 2,3 ]]'s Articles
Terms of Use
No data!
Social Bookmark/Share
All comments (0)
No comment.
 

Items in the repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.